Grant Details

Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs

 
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    CFDA#

    84.305
     

    Funder Type

    Federal Government

    IT Classification

    C - Funds little to no technology

    Authority

    Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

    Summary

    The Institutes purpose in awarding these grants is to provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for a disability, and (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education.

    The Institutes research grant programs are designed to provide interested individuals and the general public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. These interested individuals include parents, educators, students, researchers, and policymakers. In carrying out its grant programs, the Institute provides support for programs of research in areas of demonstrated national need.

    The Institute will conduct ten research competitions in FY 2018 through two of its centers:
    • The Institutes National Center for Education Research (NCER) will hold five competitions:
      • One competition for education research; one competition for education research and development centers;
      • one competition for partnerships and collaborations focused on problems of practice or policy; and
      • two competitions for low-cost, shortduration evaluation of education interventions.
    • The Institutes National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will hold five competitions:
      • One competition for special education research;
      • one competition for research training programs in special education;
      • two competitions for low-cost, shortduration evaluation of special education interventions; and
      • one competition for research networks focused on critical problems of policy and practice in special education
    For the FY 2018 Education Research Grants program, applicants must submit their application to one of the fourteen research topics (11 standing, three special). For each of the 11 standing topics and the three special topics identified for FY 2018, purpose, requirements, and respective Program Officer(s) can be found in the program guidance.
     
    1. Cognition and Student Learning: The Cognition and Student Learning (CASL) topic supports research that capitalizes on our understanding of how the mind works to inform and improve education practice in reading, writing, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics), and study skills.
    2. Early Learning Programs and Policies: The Early Learning Programs and Policies (Early Learning) topic supports research on the improvement of school readiness skills (pre-reading; pre-writing; early STEM (science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics); and social and behavioral competencies) of 3- to 5-year-olds.
    3. Education Leadership: The Education Leadership (Leadership) topic supports research on programs, policies, and practices to support leaders in K-12 education systems at the school, district, or state level in order to improve leadership in ways that can lead to beneficial student education outcomes. Education leaders include district superintendents and administrators, school principals, and other personnel in leadership roles such as teacher-leaders, vice- and assistant principals, school boards, turn-around specialists, curriculum supervisors, talent management specialists, assessment directors, and principal supervisors.
    4. Education Technology: The Education Technology topic supports research on innovative and emerging forms of education technologies intended for use in authentic education settings (e.g., schools, after-school programs, and distance learning or on-line programs under the control of schools or state and local education agencies) by students or teachers (or other instructional personnel), with the goal of improving academic performance among students in pre-kindergarten through grade 12.
    5. Effective Teachers and Effective Teaching: The Effective Teachers and Effective Teaching (Effective Teachers) topic supports research on strategies for improving classroom teaching in ways that promote student learning and achievement in reading and writing; STEM (science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics); and -- for English Learners -- English language proficiency, from kindergarten through high school.
    6. English Learners: The English Learners topic supports research to improve the education outcomes of English Learners (ELs) from kindergarten through high school. The Institute uses the term English Learner under a broad definition encompassing all students whose home language is not English and whose English language proficiency hinders their ability to meet learning and achievement expectations for students at their grade level.
    7. Improving Education Systems: The Improving Education Systems (Systems) topic supports research on K-12 education at the school, district, state, or national level. Systems projects focus on specific practices, programs, and policies intended to improve education systems or to improve the systems ability to implement reforms (e.g., whole school reforms; resource reallocation across schools/districts based on student need).
    8. Postsecondary and Adult Education: The Postsecondary and Adult Education topic supports research on the improvement of education outcomes for students in college and in adult education programs.
    9. Reading and Writing: The Reading and Writing (Read/Write) topic supports research on the improvement of reading and writing skills of students from kindergarten through high school.
    10. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education: The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education topic supports research on the improvement of STEM knowledge and skills of students from kindergarten through high school. Since 2002, the Institute has made significant progress in helping to support rigorous, scientific research in mathematics and science that is relevant to education practice and policy (see Compendium of Math and Science Research Funded by NCER and NCSER: 2002-2013). Research on the other two domains of STEM, technology and engineering education, has been minimal. Through the formal introduction of technology and engineering into this years Education Research Grants program, the Institute encourages research focusing on improving student education outcomes across one or more of the four domains of STEM education.
    11. Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning: The Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning (Social/Behavioral) topic supports research on social skills, attitudes, and behaviors (i.e., social and behavioral competencies) to improve student achievement and progress through the education system from kindergarten through high school. Through this topic, the Institute is interested in understanding ways to support the development of social/behavioral competencies such as social skills (e.g., responsibility, cooperation), learning strategies (e.g., goal-setting, self-regulated learning), dispositions or attitudes (e.g., motivation, academic selfconcept), and behaviors (e.g., constructive participation, attendance) that research suggests may help students succeed in school and work.
    12. Special Topics in Education Research:
      1.  Arts in Education: The Arts in Education special topic supports research to understand the implementation and effects of arts programs and policies at the K-12 level in order to improve the education outcomes of students. Research connecting student participation in the arts to academic outcomes and social/behavioral competencies has the potential to inform contemporary policy debates regarding the benefits of arts programming in schools.
      2. Career and Technical Education: The Career and Technical Education (CTE) special topic supports research to understand the implementation and effects of CTE programs and policies at the K-12 level in order to improve the education and career outcomes of students.
      3. Systemic Approaches to Educating Highly Mobile Students: The Systemic Approaches to Educating Highly Mobile Students (Highly Mobile Students) special topic supports research to improve the education outcomes of students who face social/behavioral and academic challenges because they frequently move from school to school because of changes in residence and/or unstable living arrangements. This category of students, typically referred to as highly mobile students, includes students who are homeless, in foster care, from migrant backgrounds, or military-dependent.
     

    History of Funding

    None is available.

    Additional Information

    Applications under the Education Research Grants program must meet the requirements set out under the subheadings below (1) Student Education Outcomes, (2) Authentic Education Settings, (3) Topics, (4) Goals, and (5) Dissemination in order to be sent forward for scientific peer review.
     
    Student Education Outcomes All research supported under the Education Research Grants program must address the education outcomes of students and include measures of these outcomes. The Institute is most interested in two types of education outcomes: (1) student academic outcomes and (2) student social and behavioral competencies that support success in school and afterwards. Student education outcomes should align with the theory of change guiding the proposed research and applicants should describe this alignment when discussing student outcomes and their measures.
    1. Academic Outcomes The Institute supports research on a diverse set of student academic outcomes that fall under two categories. The first reflects learning and achievement in core academic content areas. The second category reflects students successful progression through the education system.
    2. Social and Behavioral Competencies The Institute supports research on social and behavioral competencies, which are defined as social skills, attitudes, and behaviors that are important to students academic and post-academic success. Social and behavioral competencies may be the primary focus of your research under certain topics so long as your application makes clear how they relate to academic outcomes.
     Authentic Education Settings Proposed research must be relevant to education in the United States and must address factors under the control of the U.S. education system (be it at the national, state, local, or school level). To help ensure such relevance, the Institute requires researchers to work within or with data from authentic education settings. Authentic education settings include both in-school settings (including PreK centers) and formal programs that take place after school or out of school (e.g., after-school programs, distance learning programs, online programs) under the control of schools or state and local education agencies. Formal programs not under the control of schools or state and local education agencies are not considered as taking place in authentic education settings and are not appropriate for study under the Education Research Grants program.
    • The Institute permits a limited amount of laboratory research if it is carried out in addition to work within or with data from authentic education settings but will not fund any projects that are exclusively based in laboratories. Applications with 100 percent of the research taking place in laboratory settings will be deemed nonresponsive and not sent forward for scientific peer review. 
    Topics The Institute uses a topic structure to encourage focused programs of research. The Institutes current topic structure includes 11 standing topics and three special topics. Through all of its standing topics, the Institute supports field-generated research, each with specific Sample, Outcomes, and Setting requirements. The Institute also identifies critical research gaps within each of the 11 standing topics to encourage applications in areas where research is lacking. Applications must be directed to one of the fourteen topics accepting applications for the FY 2018 competition.

    Goals The Institute uses a goal structure to encourage focused research along the continuum of research, development, and evaluation activities necessary for building a scientific education research enterprise. Therefore, applications must be directed to one of five research goals: Exploration; Development and Innovation; Efficacy and Replication; Effectiveness; or Measurement.
    • The Exploration goal supports the identification of malleable factors associated with student education outcomes and/or the factors and conditions that mediate or moderate that relationship. By doing so, Exploration projects are intended to build and inform theoretical foundations for (1) the development of interventions or the evaluation of interventions, or (2) the development and validation of assessments.
    • The Development and Innovation goal (Development/Innovation) supports the development of new interventions and the further development or modification of existing interventions that are intended to produce beneficial impacts on student education outcomes when implemented in authentic education settings.
    • The Efficacy and Replication goal (Efficacy/Replication) supports the evaluation of fully developed education interventions with evidence of promise for improving student education outcomes, as well as education interventions that are widely used but not yet rigorously tested, to determine whether they produce a beneficial impact on student education outcomes relative to a counterfactual when they are implemented under ideal or routine conditions by the end user in authentic education settings. The Institute supports the initial evaluation of an intervention as well as replication studies for interventions with evidence of positive student benefits from prior rigorous evaluations. The Institute supports a variety of replication efforts ranging from direct replications that seek to duplicate all aspects of a previous efficacy study to conceptual replications that duplicate some or most aspects, but make changes in the setting, sample, or implementation conditions to answer new questions about the intervention (for instance, whether it will be effective for a broader group of students or in different schools). The Institute also supports replications that take advantage of methodological advances to provide more precise estimates of intervention effects.
    • The Effectiveness goal supports the independent evaluation of fully developed education interventions with prior evidence of efficacy to determine whether they produce a beneficial impact on student education outcomes relative to a counterfactual when they are implemented by the end user under routine conditions in authentic education settings.
    • The Measurement goal supports (1) the development of new assessments or refinement of existing assessments (Development/Refinement Projects) or (2) the validation of existing assessments for specific purposes, contexts, and populations (Validation Projects).
    Dissemination Education Research Grants projects are intended to cover the range of research, development, and evaluation activities necessary to (1) advance our understanding of and practices for teaching, learning, and organizing education systems, and (2) advance scientific knowledge and theory on learning, instruction, and education systems in order to provide solutions to the education problems in our nation. To this end, the Institute is committed to making the results of Institute-funded research available to a wide range of audiences.

    The Institute has added a requirement to include a Dissemination Plan in your application. If your application does not include the required Dissemination Plan, it will be deemed noncompliant and will not be forwarded for scientific peer review.

    Contacts

    Dr. Katina Stapleton

    Dr. Katina Stapleton
    Education Leadership
    550 12th Street, SW
    Washington', DC 20024
    (202) 245-6566

    Dr. Caroline Ebanks

    Dr. Caroline Ebanks
    Early Learning Programs and Policies
    550 12th Street, SW
    Washington', DC 20024
    (202) 245-8320

    Erin Higgins

    Erin Higgins
    Cognition and Student Learning
    550 12th Street, SW
    Washington', DC 20024
    (202) 245-6541
     

  • Eligibility Details

    Applicants that have the ability and capacity to conduct scientifically valid research are eligible to apply. Eligible applicants include, but are not limited to, nonprofit and for-profit organizations and public and private agencies and institutions of higher education, such as colleges and universities.

    Deadline Details

    The Institute strongly encouraged potential applicants to submit a Letter of Intent by June 22, 2017. Letters of Intent were optional but strongly encouraged. Letters of Intent were to be submitted online at https://iesreview.ed.gov. Applications were to be submitted electronically and received no later than 4:30:00 p.m., Washington, DC time on August 17, 2017 via www.grants.gov. A similar deadline is anaticipated, annually.

    Award Details

    Although the Institute intends to support the research topics and goals described in this announcement, all awards pursuant to this Request for Applications are contingent upon the availability of funds and the receipt of meritorious applications. The Institute makes its awards to the highest quality applications, as determined through scientific peer review, regardless of topic or goal.

    The size of the award depends on the research goal and scope of the project. Please attend to the duration and budget maximums set for each goal. Applications requesting a project length longer than the maximum or a budget higher than the maximum, your application will be deemed nonresponsive and will not be reviewed. These programs do not require cost sharing or matching.

    Research Goal
    Exploration: 
    • Secondary Data Analysis only: 2 years; Maximum award $600,000.
    • Primary Data Collection and Analysis: 4 years; Maximum award $1,400,000.
    Development and Innovation
    • Maximum Grant Duration: 4 years; Maximum award $1,400,000.
    Efficiency and Replication 
    • Efficiency: Maximum Grant Duration: 5 years; Maximum award $3,300,000.
    • Replication: Maximum Grant Duration: 5 years; Maximum award $3,300,000.
    • Follow-up: Maximum Grant Duration: 3 years; Maximum award $1,100,000.
    • Retrospective: Maximum Grant Duration: 3 years; Maximum award $700,000.
    Effectiveness
    • Effectiveness: Maximum Grant Duration: 5 years; Maximum award $3,800,000.
    • Follow-up: Maximum Grant Duration: 3 years; Maximum award $1,400,000.
    Measurement
    • Maximum Grant Duration: 4 years; Maximum award $1,400,000.



     

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